Paghinumdum Sang Ako Bata Pa Sadto (Hiligaynon dialect of the Visayans in the Philippines)

Paghinumdum Sang Ako Bata Pa Sadto
ni Maria Cristina A. Villaralvo

 

Sang una pa nga panahon sa akon pagpanumdom, ang akon lang nga handum amo ang manamit nga pagkaon.
Sa kabudlay sang kabuhi sa kaumahan kun diin ako nagdaku kag nagkabuhi, ang dahon dahon sa palibot lagaun lang kag imimi sa kamatis nga may asin kag may kan on nga manami, sampat gid sulbad na ang hiribati sang maubusan nga gahinibi.
Kay kulang ang isa ka baso nga tinig ang sa anom ka kabataan, si nanay hinali nga nagtak ang sang iya nga tinig ang.
Tapos tig ab kag panghugas pinggan, kami tanan nagdinalagan kay si tatay nag abot dun halin sa kaumahan may dala nga turagsoy kag puyo baw kanamit lapwahan.
Mangahoy kami sa kawayanan kag manag ub anay bago maghampang, pag abot sang kahapunanon bago ang bulan magsubang kami tanan sa altar mag atubang ang orasyon paga umpisahan.
Ang kasimple sang amuni nga pangabuhi ang indi ko gid ikambyo sa bulawan nga masiri. Ang kalipay nga akon naambit bisan sa kabudlay sang pangabuhi, basta si tatay, si nanay pirmi ara kun ako nagahibi indi ko gid itandi sa mga mangad nga brilyante akun sa bulawan nga masiri.
Sa pagtapak ko sa bag o nga pinanid sang istorya sang akon kabuhi, pangamuyo ko lang nga ang pamilya nga sa akon ginhatag sang hamili, mapangapinan ko sa mga hitabu nga hinali, kag matipon ko sa isa ka bubong asta ang mga magburugto makakita sang ila pinili man nga pangabuhi.

17883725_1400154946720903_8510260225325676023_n

Advertisements

The Woman I Know…this is Virgie (for Virgie Paragas-Adonis)

The Woman I Know… this is Virgie

(For Virgie Paragas-Adonis)

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

 

With boundless desire

to accomplish many things

that others think are impossible,

the woman I know

through impeding hurdles

would just simply breeze through.

Her mother’s strength and loving ways

tempered by her father’s intelligence

and innate golden values –

her overpowering person shows..

 

A woman of fiery temper

and a heart brimming with affection,

the woman I know

always fights for the righteousness

not much for her own

but for others who, though abused

can’t fight back

as guts and  persistence

are what they lack.

 

She is the woman I know,

who, on some occasion

could be furious or let out tears

in a candid show of emotion.

 

She oozes with intelligence

that she would unselfishly share

just like the comfort

of her tender motherly care.

Could there be other women

just like this one I know?       

10430456_10205781633130523_4746175866961168608_n                                     

ON PREPAREDNESS WHEN TRAGEDY OR CALAMITY STRIKES

(The author is a Grade 10 and 15-year old student of the Tacurong National High School. The essay garnered First Prize during the Essay Writing Contest in commemoration of the National Disaster Resilience Month held at the Tacurong Pilot Elementary School on July 3, 2018. Her coach is Ms. Marites Goce.)

 

ON PREPAREDNESS WHEN TRAGEDY OR CALAMITY OCCURS

By Joanna Marie Goloyugo

 

 

Humans are given the gift of life and have very strong survival instinct. The need to preserve life courses down through their mind and body, especially, when faced with life and death situations. The survival instinct pushes to strive their way out of chaos, forcing them to thin, “I need to stay alive”. Unfortunately, this instinctive urge is not enough to save humans from direly threatening situations that result from unforeseen occurrences caused by Mother Nature, as well as, other human beings. In this regard, there is a need for preparedness as it can mitigate or lessen the physical, mental and emotional trauma when a unforeseen events occur.

 

The abrupt occurrences of typhoon, floods, earthquakes and other calamities, leave the Philippines shaken and in complete tatters…shambles…disarray. They create chaos in the affected communities and to be blamed partly is the negligence of man.  The victims leave the world, their cold remains viewed for a lasting memory of their loved ones.  Here’s why….despite all the conducted drills, trainings and seminars, the nation still faces devastating results from calamities and disasters. Lives are lost, properties are destroyed, despite which, the people never learn, making the government re-evaluations useless. Lessons are never learned.

 

The National Disaster and Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC) encourages citizens to be prepared for emergency situations. The Republic Act 1-121, NDRRM Act that was implemented on May 2010 has four core functions: Mitigation and Prevention, Preparedness, Response, Rehabilitation and Recovery. They serve as guides in the drills conducted in schools and workplaces, and should also be observed in homes to prepare families for the occurrences that result to huge losses, both in life and property. At the helm of this effort is the Secretary of Department of National Defense (DND), Ricardo Jalad. Its aim is to transform the country’s emergency management system from “Disaster Relief and Response” to “Disaster Risk Reduction”. The aforementioned RA 1-121 repealed the Presidential Decree No. 1566 that was enacted in 1978, the emergency management of which centered only on the hazards and impacts of a disaster or calamity.  On the other hand, the current law provides that the citizens should be prepared for them to know what to do before, during and after an occurrence.

 

Unfortunately, despite the directives from the government, some agencies both private and public do not conduct drills regularly. If they do, the concerned people treat the drill as some kind of a “play”…without seriousness. This attitude practically, makes the objective of the emergency preparedness fly over their head. In some schools, teachers observed that the students do not give much thought of the drill being conducted. Their nonchalance shows that they do not care much about the importance of the drill and its use for any untoward occurrence in the future. Some are observed without seriousness in practicing the ducking which is about the covering of the head with both hands, a simple act which is neglected by many participants.

 

When seminars and orientations are conducted by the agency involved in rescue, disaster prevention and risk management, many students are observed as not paying attention to the resource speakers. They chat with away the time with seatmates, play with their cellphones, or worst, skip such activity that their school has painstakingly arranged for them.

 

Knowledge plays a very important part in a person’s chance for survival. Even a simple rule such as avoiding large or tall objects, trees or buildings due to the possibility of their collapsing, is vital to survival. For this effort, there is a concerted effort among concerned agencies and the schools to make the students aware of the value of disaster preparedness. Along this line, rescue agencies of local governments conduct seminars and trainings in school with the aim of preventing or minimizing the damaging effects on humans and properties.

 

Meanwhile, the acquired knowledge may not be enough as there is always the possibility for panic to strike, especially, during the actual occurrence of an earthquake for instance and horrific car crash or accident as they make the mind blank which hinders the chances of survival. To quote Laurence Gonzales, the author of the bestselling book, “Deep Survival”, he said, “It’s been proven that if you put someone under pressure, he can’t solve simple mathematical equations or recall a sequence of words.” He added that, “In effect, losing your cool makes you stupid. That’s an oversimplification but emotions and reason work together like a seesaw. The higher emotion a person feels, the lower becomes his ability to reason. But reason is what’s going to get you out of trouble.”

 

There have been many instances where people know what to do but their emotion becomes unstable and because of extreme pressure and fear, they fail to adapt to the situation at hand. In the case of the well-known tragedy, the sinking of the Titanic, a survivor stated that when the water began to fill the ship, the passengers went into frenzy, jumped out of the window right into the cold ocean…others grabbed a hold to overloaded lifeboats which almost capsize while others just stood still, shocked. As mentioned earlier, though man has the innate survival instinct like animals, but when caught in perilous moment, some chose to stand still like a deer staring at the headlights of an oncoming car, practically waiting to be bumped.

 

Laurence Gonzalez spent three and a half decades studying survivors’ stories, taking note who have lived or died and reasons why. Finally, he concluded that, “Personality, emotions, attitude and how well a person can cope to adversity have much more to do in survival than any type of equipment.”

 

To be mentally and emotionally prepared is a very crucial factor in survival. This reminder has been repeatedly mentioned in seminars, trainings, and drills – a statement that holds the key to the gate of survival, summarized in two words, “Don’t Panic”. As aforementioned, it is essentially important to stay collected and calm during chaotic times so that the brains can function properly which includes avoiding careless mistakes or reckless actions which are usually spurred on by the heat of the moment.

 

LDS psychologist, Dr. Ella Gourgouris, one of the leading experts in Traumatic Stress Response stated, “One of the best ways to get the mind to perform under pressure is to physically practice beforehand. Dr. Terry Lyles, a fellow psychologist under the same department as Dr. Gourgouris also added, “The more prepared you are, the panicked you are going to be when things go wrong. But you have to practice it…it is not enough just to know it.”

 

The DRRM applies the preparations through seminars ad trainings conducted by agencies, among which are the Red Cross and the Junior Emergency Response Team (JERT) member using scenarios where in which a disaster has hit a community and capable residents apply first aid to the injured. Such activity could create a prepared mindset which is very necessary. In schools, frequent drills and trainings could also create a prepared mindset such that when the alarm is sounded throughout the campus, students are supposed to immediately go to the designated evacuation area with the teachers doing headcounts to make sure that none is missing.

 

It is suggested that for a better observation of behavior in a threatening situation, unannounced or surprised drills should be conducted with the alarm sounded without prior notice to anyone except the top management of an establishment or institution, for instance. That way, those affected can be observed if they instinctively do the ducking properly, aside from protective acts. After the event, analysis of what have been observed can be made and corrections can be made as necessary. The affected should be made to feel the fear and the accompanying adrenalin rush, aside from the pressure and panic which can be made as basis in the evaluation based on which guidelines on how they could remain calm and cool during adversities could be made, thereby, avoiding eventual death.

 

Being alive is the most wonderful gift humans have ever received. But staying alive is hard as unexpected events could claim lives as fast as the speed of light. Humans can prevent this by being prepared for any eventuality that does not necessitate being a part of an organization or big group and to be able to help, one need not be a member of a response or rescue team. Know what to do during unfortunate events, hence, having been prepared for these is more than enough to mitigate the nation’s economic losses and human casualties. And, when the unfortunate events occur, institutions and agencies all over the country can proudly exclaim that, “WE ARE PREPARED!”.

JM Adie Goloyugo

 

 

 

Eid Ul Fitr in Tacurong City

The Celebration of Eid Ul Fitr in Tacurong City

by Apolinario Villalobos

 

The Eid Ul Fitr in Tacurong City was celebrated on the grounds of the City Hall in front of the city gym…the faithful did not mind the moist grass in the early morning of June 15, 2018…

 

The AG Dragon Fruit Farm (Barangay Lilit, Lambayong, Sultan Kudarat, Philippines)

THE AG DRAGON FRUIT FARM

…barangay Lilit, Lambayong (Sultan Kudarat, Philippines)

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

When I reached barangay Lilit, in Lambayong, I was surprised to find an orchard, not only planted to a cactus variety bearing fruits that came to be known as “dragon” perhaps, because of the skin that looks like scales, but also to lime or “calamansi” as well. The lime trees were profusely bearing late fruits, most of which hidden behind thick clusters of leaves.

 

According to the couple, G-Anne and Arnold, they started with the mangoes in the 3 hectare- farm. Unfortunately, the tropical fruit did not fare well, so that they were cut down to be made into charcoal. They tried the lime which somehow, brought in good yields. But, when Arnold got fascinated with the dragon fruit, as it has become a fad all over the country due to its nutritional value and consistently high price, he bought starter cuttings at Php50 per post. He used the upright system with stems that bear flowers allowed to extend freely. That was in 2016. Another type of raising the cactus for its fruits is by connecting the posts with wires  or thin cables to form some sort of a trellis.

 

Of the 3 hectares, ¾ of the area is planted to the cactus while the remaining space is retained for the lime.  Mrs. G-Anne Guerrero shared that the dragon fruit venture has so far shown a good promise of success. The first week of June saw a “pick and pay holiday” when the orchard was opened to walk-ins who enjoyed the American-style of fruit picking. On the other hand there is a need to check on a regular basis the clumps of cactus tied on the concrete posts so that segments infected with fungus could be cut off.

 

During my Sunday visit, the family was preparing for the arrival of guests from Manila and other parts of the province. Also, a relative, Ferdinand Pascua of the Department of Trade and Industry, Legal Department  (DTI-Manila) dropped by. The rest who were around during my quick visit were Meciel Abalos de la Cruz and Paulo Guerrero, the couple’s son who works at the Provincial Capitol of Sultan Kudarat, and Gerril Guerrero, barangay Poblacion Kagawad. As it was a late breakfast time, kalentubo, a Maguindanao rice curry conically wrapped in banana leaf was brought out as well as slices of the red variety of dragon fruit to go with coffee.

 

The Guerrero Orchard at Purok Lilit is about three minutes travel from downtown passing through barangay Pag-asa. The way is replete with refreshing view of rice fields that would turn into a sea of undulating green and become tinted with yellow as harvest time approaches.

 

The AG Fruit Farm is a typical “micro farm” with every available space utilized to the maximum so that even standing pruned trees serve as hosts to the clinging cactus. Sharing the area are lime trees, as earlier mentioned. Even cluster of yam are left to grow on their own, as well as, cluster of kangkong for that matter.

 

 

The Lims of Cotabato by Jose “Boyet” Lim III

THE LIMs OF COTABATO…

By Jose “Boyet” Lim III

 

Not much is known about them now as time has eroded the sturdier chapters of their history, as is bound to happen in all matters undocumented.

From word of mouth, the first settler from China of the family landed in the hostile shores of the western side of Mindanao probably between 1870-90s, as what, or as who, is not known with certainty. It can merely be surmised that he must had been a very adventurous fellow, or a simpleton who knew nothing better than staying afoot in the midst of Moros.

As fate would plot it, however, he must had been able to assimilate with the Moros and the natives, and more than that, married a distant descendant of Sultan Kudarat. That must had repositioned his place in those times’ social order from a drifter of the high seas to the ranks of emerging local chieftains.

One of his sons, christened Jose Lim Sr, better known as Binsuan among the Moros and locals, was such a popular toughie on that western Mindanao seaboard that he got himself elected as the first mayor of what then was simply known as Cotabato. It was during his administration that the Quirino Bridge connecting Nuling, now the town of Sultan Kudarat, to the city, and the erstwhile Cotabato City Hall which is currently being developed into a City Museum, were built. To his small legacy was renamed Felipe II Street to Jose Lim Sr Street in downtown Cotabato City.

His son of his namesake, Jose Lim Jr., is my father. As a young man, he was sent by my grandfather to the rescue of businessmen in Buluan who were having tax woes, as their bookkeeper. There he met my mother, the maiden Concepcion Antiporda, a native of Tayug, Pangasinan and a pharmacist from the University of the East in Manila serving her rural community time, yes, of all places, in Buluan.

Arsenio Lim, who is today celebrating his 50th wedding anniversary with my Aunt Myrna Barracoso of Coron, is my father’s half brother, and my uncle. The handsome fellow standing in the picture is Arsenio Lim, Jr., “Chin Chin” to us, his son, who is a known dentist in Davao City with a Master’s Degree in Dental Surgery from Australia. His wife Jen, is also a dentist. Both are practicing their profession at the Lim Dental Clinic along Tomas Claudio Street, now Quirino Avenue, Davao City. If you want to save on their professional fees, call me. We’ll split the discount.

The beautiful lady to the right is Judith, my darling first cousin. Her father is Rodolfo, closest brother to my father. Like my father, Uncle Rody was a toughie and lived on his own from age 12. He passed away some years ago, but not before he was able to join us in the birthday celebration of my father at my place, which in our recollection, has become one of the most memorable get-togethers our family ever had in Davao City.

The lady on the left must be one of my Muslim cousins. Pretty too, right?

If I were in Cotabato City now, I would be speaking on behalf of my father, at this 50th Wedding Anniversary celebration.

To Uncle Babes and Auntie Myrna, it is probably easier now to get to Pluto than to get to what you have accomplished as parents and a great couple of 50 years. Yours is an example for all of us to emulate, which is a tall order for a Lim, but which, nevertheless, should be a burning inspiration to the younger men and women of this generation. You have gone thru the whole nine yards to show that parenting is a lifetime profession goldenly worth it as may be gleaned from the fruits of your tree.

The spirit of that Chinaman of the 1890s must now be hovering in his chinky grin over your celebration.

Like him, we too are mighty proud of you!
Congratulations!

34872000_10212378924011321_5327739306704371712_n

 

HISTORIC LAMBAYONG (Sultan Kudarat Province, Philippines)

HISTORIC LAMBAYONG

(Sultan Kudarat Province, Philippines)

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The historical significance of Lambayong could be traced back to the time when its vast expanse was ruled by a Muslim Royal House connected to Sultan sa Barongis. The Ala River played a major part in the lives of the early inhabitants being the main artery of commerce due to the absence of a road system. During the time, the four thriving settlements in the whole of Cotabato aside from what is now Cotabato City, itself, were Dulawan, Lambayong, Midsayap and Buluan. Before Lambayong was created as a town, as it was then part of Sultan sa Barongis, the area was referred to as “Torre” due to the presence of a Spanish tower which time has deteriorated. Ferdinand Marcos, issued PD #341 on November 22, 1973 that transferred Lambayong from Cotabato to Sultan Kudarat with its name changed to Mariano Marcos in honor of his father. But when Corazon Aquino took over as President, it was renamed Lambayong by virtue of Republic Act #6678 signed on October 12, 1988.

 

Lambayong is named after the flower-bearing creeper that grows in profusion on wet lands with which the town has plenty. The purplish cup-like petals are a sight to behold from a distance as they undulate with the dark waxy-textured green leaves when blown by the wind.

 

Christians began to settle in Lambayong as early as the 1930s but the early 1950s saw the greater volume of hordes from Visayas, particularly, Iloilo. Among them was led by the late Serafin Bernardo whose son, Nonito, confided that their group which consisted not only of their family but friends and relatives, took a barge from Cotabato City for Dulawan from which they took another barge to Lambayong. The Rio Grande de Mindanao that emanates from Cotabato City and the Ala River that flows through the Lambayong area, join at Dulawan.

 

During the 1950s, Lambayong was already a thriving settlement with many Christian families dominating the settled area along the highway. Purportedly, many prominent families who got settled in Tacurong City stayed for awhile in the homes and buildings of the early settlers of Lambayong, one of which was owned by the Guerreros. Some families decided to settle around Gansing and Kipolot while the rest, such as the group of Serafin Bernardo went on to New Passi which at the time was part of Katil. From there, some families settled in Rajah Muda and went up the hills of Magon.

 

Buluan was made accessible from Lambayong through Gansing and Kipolot by foot trails which the settlers blazed toward President Quirino which at the time was called Sambolawan, to trade in a designated area that settlers during the time, referred to as “Pamasang”. Buluan is the “mother town” of Tacurong and President Quirino. (This information was confirmed by my interviewees from Buluan who got the information from their parents.)

 

There was an early attempt of the government to connect the thriving settlements in the hinterlands of Cotabato that included Midsayap, Sultan sa Barongis and Lambayong with Makar in Dadiangas which is now known as General Santos City. It is named after General Paulino Santos who cleared the once sandy area for settlement by Christians from Visayas and Luzon . The proposed highway was what is now called in Tacurong City as “Alunan Highway”, but before was known as, “Mid-Makar Road” or “Midsayap-Makar Road” that passed through Lambayong and ended at Kalandagan in Tacurong, beyond which was a trail fit for carts only. Affluent students from Gansing and Tacurong hiked from Tacurong to Marbel on Sundays and hiked back home on Saturday, as for the rest of the week, they stayed at boarding homes in Marbel. Heavy provisions such as sacks of rice were loaded on a cart pulled by carabao. There were no tricycles, jeepneys, most especially, buses yet.

 

Lambayong, during the arrival of the settlers from the Visayas and Luzon, was covered with thickets and cleared for rice paddies and corn plots which in time expanded. Water for irrigation was coaxed from streams that abound in the area. The manifestation of this abundance of water, in fact, “sweet” spring water, is the presence of the six (6) continuously  flowing water out of upright tubes at the town’s six (6) purok or sitio and the one used by the District Hospital. The fertility of the soil is also fit for rice which ensured abundant harvest and made Lambayong earn the title, “Rice Bowl of Cotabato” when it was yet one whole province before the creation of the four provinces. Today, it is still fondly referred to as a “Rice Bowl” but of Sultan Kudarat Province.

 

The 26 barangays of Lambayong are: Caridad (Cuyapon), Didtaras, Gansing (Bilumen), Kabulakan, Kapingkong, Katitisan, Katitisan, Lagao, Lilit, Madanding, Maligaya, Mamali, Matiompong, Midtapok, New Cebu, Palumbi, Pidtiguian, Pimbalayan, Pingulaman,Poblacion (Lambayong), Sadsalan, Seneben, Sigayan, Tambak, Tinumigues, Tumiao (Tinaga), and Udtong.

The municipality covers a total land area of 226.99 square kilometers or 87.60 square miles.

 

Though without impressive big commercial structures, Lambayong is trying its best to maintain a harmonious and cordial ambiance which is necessary to erase the bad image it had at the height of the conflict between the Christians and Muslims during the early 1970s. Impressively, farmers hold with steadfast firmness to their rice fields and vegetable plots instead of converting them into subdivisions. Attempts are being made to raise the nutritious dragon fruit which consistently commands a high price in Manila. Another tradition which is maintained is the production of raw sugar in the form of muscovado.  For more delectable offerings of the town, one should visit the public market on a Sunday for tinagtag, panyalam, smoked fish and many more.

 

To commemorate the harmony between Christians and Muslims in Lambayong, the government came up with TIMPUYOG Festival celebrated every October of each year.                Groups compete for the best in street dancing and costume.

 

Currently, the mayor of Lambayong is HON. RAMON M. ABALOS.