The Act of Kindness…a message to parents

The Act of Kindness

…a message to parents

By Apolinario Villalobos

The act of kindness should not be a means to an end, but the reason, in itself. In other words, we should not be kind to others, just because we want to go to heaven, but because we want to do it to for the sake of others. Acting kindly should be spontaneous. The act should form part of our habit. By acting this way, we will forget to count our indulgences which others are prone in doing. The act of kindness should end when the action is done, so that any return for such act is not considered.

In this regard, parents should stop telling their kids to be kind to others so that Jesus will love them. Children should be told to be kind, because by being so they are helping others. Of course, there is always Jesus or God or heaven as reasons every time we do kind acts. But, foremost, as our reason to be kind should be the expectation of us, as human beings, intelligent creatures, who should be kind to others. The clever guys may ask, what happens then to the Ten Commandments?

For the question above, I also ask, how about the aborigines who do not know God?… those in the hinterlands and jungles who have not seen a missionary, much more a Bible or a cross? Don’t they have the right to go to heaven even if they have done acts of kindness, just because nobody told them about such an eternal paradise? The unconscious dispensing of kind acts by these people who, in the eyes of others are uncivilized, deserve more heavenly recognition that what some evil-minded, though, college or university-educated and church-going humans are doing!

Parents should tell their children that they should be kind to others because the latter deserve respect due them as human beings. And, blessings should be shared with them because they need the help to be able to survive. We should do only those, and just leave to God the judgment if our acts are worthy of a place in heaven. Again, we should not count our acts of kindness.

Every Christmas, some parents are even going farther, by warning their kids not to be bad because Santa Claus will not give them gifts. Christianity or any religion that observes Christmas never teaches that! Santa Claus is not even mentioned in the Bible or whatever book of any religion. Santa Claus just like the Christmas tree, is just a symbol of the pagan way of celebrating Christmas, to have a semblance of festivity. Christmas is all about the humble birth of Jesus Christ. And, what has been originally celebrated was the baptism of Jesus Christ. It was only one of the early popes who thought of giving importance to the birthday of Jesus Christ, with the exact date not yet even officially established, and to give it a facade of joyful celebration for the sake of the converted pagans, used their early practices that are still being observed today.

A mother confided to me that when she told her child that Santa Claus is a missionary, the child in all innocence, asked her mother why he does not wear a cross, or carry a Bible! The mother was caught flat-footed, and she told me that she felt so ashamed of what she told her child, vowing never to tell her lies again.

The erroneous way of developing kindness in the personality of a child has done its toll. The wrong notion about kindness has become an integral part of the obnoxious attitude of some children which they will pass on to their own children when they become parents, themselves. The world is so full of children with this kind of attitude, with the parents themselves, to be blamed for their “spoiled” upbringing. This is a general observation. If some parents are doing the right thing, they need not react defensively. Unfortunately, I may be pessimistic, by sharing that I see no end to this vicious cycle. Only voluntary contrition of parents may help. But how many parents are willing?

The Extra Mile

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.