SERAFIN P. BERNARDO….his journey from Passi, Iloilo to Tacurong, Sultan Kudarat (Part 1)

SERAFIN P. BERNARDO…his journey from Passi, Iloilo to Tacurong, Sultan Kudarat (Part 1)

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The ancestral family of  Serafin P. Bernardo is from the Negros province, particulary, Victorias, but settled in Passi, Iloilo which they, henceforth, considered as their hometown. He had a penpal, Ciloy Levita who invited him to check Tacurong for himself if it would suit his adventurous plan to settle in Mindanao. During the time, the undeveloped territory of Tacurong extended as far as San Felipe of Tantangan. In 1946, when the WWII just ended, he finally visited Tacurong to check and went as far as the area that is now covered by Kalandagan and Carmen after which he left again for Passi where he was working as Chief of Police.

 

In 1948, he came back to Tacurong with his family in tow, Elisa Panizales, the wife, and three children, Nenita, Nonito, and Judith. When they arrived in Cotabato, the family took a “ferry” that brought them to Buluan. During the time, visitors with plenty of luggage usually disembarked at Buluan which had some sort of a “pier”. Those with a few luggage went as far as Sapakan, bordering Ligwasan Marsh and crossed the river to Tinumiguez, then proceeded to Lambayong which was well developed ahead of Tacurong.

 

Among the prominent families in Lambayong then, were the Guerreros and Luceros. The only road from Lambayong that ended into a foot trail that branched into several, was a portion of what is now Alunan highway.  For this reason, old Hispanic houses could still be found in the area, prominent among which is the Rapacon residence. The areas encompassing what is today’s downtown were either rice fields or marsh lands. When they arrived in Tacurong, Serafin bought a lot along Mabini St. where he build a big house behind which he built another smaller house that the Levitas occupied. Later he bought another lot near MINPROCOR, particularly, along Quezon Ave. St. which was given to the said family.

 

Serafin’s  youngest daughter, Judith and son, Nonito, recalled that their father purchased 5 hectares of land in an area which was then called “Mangilala” (referred today as the one covered by Carmen and Kalandagan), followed by two more parcels of 5 hectares each. Purchases were also made beside the property by his only sister, Angelica, married to Felix Villalobos, and his youngest brother, Serafin Bernardo, Jr.

 

Later, the 15 hectares were sold, with the proceeds used to purchase lands in what is now New Passi, but which was originally referred to by settlers as “Katil”. It was purchased from DATU KANDELAYANG KAMSA. The purchase was witnessed by DATU KUDANDENG AND DATU LUMINOG. It covered more than 100 hectares of land. With the purchase sealed, he went back to Passi to invite relatives to settle in the place. That was how the Pauyas, Palomos, Parreῆos, Pamposas, Pamas, Palabricas and many more got settled in the area which they aptly named, “New Passi”. According to Tomas Pauya, he came with a group in 1954. Arriving at Lambayong, they hiked up to New Passi…he was very young then, and got enrolled in the New Passi Elementary School when his family arrived. He recalled a classmate, Lagrimas Pamposa as their consistent “First Honor”.

 

Later, the families of French, Garcia, Aguilar, Cunningham, Cordero, Panes, and many others came but settled in the adjacent area, now called Rajah Muda. Many families including those of Jarell and  Braga, also came and settled in Baras and Upper Katungal. As roads from the fast developing Tacurong were constructed, more settlers from Iloilo came and settled at Lower Katungal, Upper Katungal, Baras, New Passi and Rajah Muda. The more adventurous settlers went up to Magon and further on to Tacub where they intermarried with the Bla’ans. An area which is now part of South Cotabato was also settled by Ilonggos, hence, aptly named, “New Iloilo”. The Eastern portion of Tacurong got settled by Ilocanos while those in the North, by other settlers from the various towns of Iloilo.

 

Serafin also purchased some lands around the Dulawan Estate, the downtown area, and Dadiangas (today, General Santos City). Meanwhile, other areas near New Passi, Rajah Muda, Baras, Katungal, and Lagao were also initially settled by the Garcias and Montillas. The development brought about KENRAM (due to the early produce – kenap and ramie) and ALACor (Ala Corporation). Today, a portion of Lagao is politically recognized as Barangay JC Montilla which is covered with African palm plantations. According to Nonito Bernardo, the Dulawan Estate, included Kapingkong, Tambak, Palumbi, Udtong, and Katitisan.  Lambayong shares the border with Tacurong City’s Barangay Griῆo (formerly, Gansing). An airport station was opened at KENRAM with a short runway for commercial flights utilizing DC-3s.  It was closed when the Surallah station was opened.

 

The first mayor of Tacurong was Mr. Soriano and a photo has recorded his first meeting with the Council and officials. Serafin was among the Councilors. The development of Tacurong was hectic as shown by the organization of FACOMA (Farmers Cooperative and Marketing Association), a farmers’ cooperative with Serafin Limbungan as the first President. At the time, bridges were built along with roads that finally linked Tacurong with Marbel (today, Koronadal City), Isulan leading to Cotabato City and Surallah, as well as, Lambayong and Buluan. Today, the road to Buluan leads all the way to Davao, Kidapawan, Bukidnon, and Cagayan de Oro. Nonito Bernardo also recalled that during election campaigns, they would go to as far as San Felipe in Tantangan, as the latter was still within the political territory of Tacurong. The lone lady and most popular political figure during the time was Amalia Pabilona.

 

Ms. Nenita Bernardo recalled that when they studied in Marbel during the early 1950s, they hiked the distance from Tacurong to the said town as there was no public transportation that plied between them, then. They would hike to Marbel on Sundays with their provisions loaded on a cart pulled by a carabao. On Fridays, they would hike back to Tacurong for the weekend. For their convenience they boarded in Marbel.  With them making the trek were Lucia Paladin, Rafael and Delfin Pama, the Dasmariῆas siblings, Gelacio and Usting Panes.

 

Serafin served as Vice-Mayor in Tacurong for three consecutive terms, finally, retiring from politics to devote his time to farming. He would still wake up at 3:00AM, a habit that he did not change, roll several tobacco cigars for the day, and read what he could find around – magazines and even old issues of newspapers with the aid of an antique kerosene lamp.  Before sunrise, he would be ready to go to New Passi with his adopted son, “Digol” (Rodrigo) driving the “pick up”. He delighted in talking to relatives and farm hands the whole day in the farm. One of them recalled how during planting seasons, everyday he would  bring dried fish to be roasted on coals, while those who were not planting rice seedlings would cook “apan-apan”, kangkong sautéed in ginamos (salted krill paste).  Before dusk, he would be driven back home by Digol.

 

The Sultan Kudarat Electric Company (SUKELCO) building was among his investments in the downtown area  aside from other residential lots, including the more than 700 square meters at Mabini St. where the ancestral house stands. They were purchased with the produce coaxed from the farm. The SUKELCO building is now owned by the said cooperative. As a clarification on his acquisitions, the proceeds for their purchase came from the produce of his farms in New Passi and Baras, which today are planted to African palms.

 

As Vice-Mayor of Tacurong, his wage was not even enough for the dole outs that he made.

I have heard so many stories about his benevolence, such that relatives and acquaintances would trek to their home at Mabini St. to seek financial assistance which he readily gave. His early morning sojourns to his farm was stopped by the onset of a crippling rheumatism that affected his knees. From then on, the only opportunity for him to savor the outdoors was when he was brought to the terrace on a wheelchair where he waved back at friends who passed by. He finally rested at the age of 102.

 

 

 

Alluring Antique and the Late Governor Evelio B. Javier

Alluring Antique

And the late Gov. Evelio B. Javier

By Apolinario Villalobos

Antique is invariably likened in shape to a seahorse and described by others as an oversized serrated hemline on the western border of the three-cornered, scarf-like land mass that is Panay. It is nestled between the bluish China Sea on the west and mountain ranges on the east. With a length of 155 kilometers and a width of 33 kilometers at its widest, Antique has a total land area of approximately 252,000 hectares. Long mountain ranges separate it from the rest of the provinces of Panay Island. It is bounded on the north and northeast by Aklan, on the east by Capiz, and on the southeast by Iloilo. On the west is the Cuyo East Pass of the Sulu Sea, part of the vast China Sea.

The province is rich in metallic, as well as, non-metallic minerals. Metallic reserves include copper, chromite, gold and silver, while the non-metallic include China clay, structural clay, pottery clay, phosphate, coal and marble. A yet, undetermined volume of manganese, nickel, gold and silver are believed to abound in the lowlands of Pandan and Libertad. Coal is found on Semirara Island.

Other than rich geologic resources, Antique is also endowed by nature with alluring attributes that are bound to enthrall visitors, making them wonder how it could have stayed unnoticed for a long time.

The Antiqueῆos, just like the rest of the inhabitants of Panay Island are charming and hospitable. They are ready with a smile that can make a stranger feel at home, the moment he steps on the province’s threshold. There is a mingling tint of races in their physical make up. While some show strong Malay features, the rest are of the Ati and Spanish strains. Their Visayan dialect, called Karay-a may not sound lilting due to its rolling accent, but the intonation is pleasant to the ear.

Antique’s own kind of January festival with a religious undertone, though, with strong historic feature is called “Binirayan Festival”. The “biray” refers to the sailboats used by the ten Bornean datu who landed at Malandag, when they escaped the tyrannical rule of their sultan, Makatunaw. Their landing site at Malandag is marked with an austere structure. The celebration has caught up with the rest of the festivals of provinces of Panay, such as Ati-Atihan of Kalibo (Aklan), Dinagyang of Iloilo, and Halaran of Roxas (Capiz).

A visitor will never be bored in Antique which is blessed by nature with mountains, waterfalls, profuse wildlife, beaches and coral gardens, not to mention the historic landmarks in practically, every town. At San Jose de Buenavista, the capital, snorkeling can be enjoyed at Comun, where clusters of colorful reefs can be found. It has also its share of beautiful beaches, such as the Madranga and Taringting, where visitors usually rest after a day’s revelry during the Binirayan Festival, held at its permanent site, the La Granja.

South of San Jose de Buenavista, a little more than an hour away from downtown, is Anini-y, with its medicinal sulphuric Sira-an hot spring, that gushes out of rocks, overlooking the Panay Gulf. The town’s Hispanic past is punctuated by its centuries-old church made of white corals. It also takes pride in its two islands, Nogas and Hurao-Hurao. The former is ringed by coral gardens, while the latter can be reached by wading in the water during low tide. There’s also the Cresta del Gallo which the locals call Punta Nasog, so appropriately named because the cliffs look like a cock’s comb, especially, when they are silhouetted against the darkening horizon late in the afternoon.

A quarter of an hour’s drive from San Jose is Hamtic, the site of the first Malay settlement in Panay. The site is particularly located at Malandag, a progressive district where an austere structure serves as the marker of the historic spot.

Going northeast on a forty-five minutes of commute on a jeepney, one will reach San Remegio, a beautiful hillside town, frequented by weekenders for its two scenic waterfalls, as well as, Bato Cueva, a cave situated on a hill. From this perch, one can have a sweeping view of the plains traversed by a river down below, and cloud-capped jade mountains.

At Culasi, one will surely be impressed by the mountain ranges that serve as the boundary between the neighboring provinces of Capiz and Aklan, with Mt. Madia-as as the highest peak. Approaching the mountain from town, its awe-inspiring “hundred waterfalls” can make one gasp in admiration.

Seen from the shores of Culasi is Mararison Island which could be reached on a pumpboat in thirty minutes. During the ‘80s, we had a rare opportunity to pitch tent on it shore after our memorable climb of Mt. Madia-as. While approaching the island, we were impressed by the coral gardens below the calm waters, so that, as soon as we have pitched our tents, we raced to them. Practically, the whole island is ringed by the coral colonies with varying depths. A surprise was the freshwater spring whose gushes can only be enjoyed during the low tide, as it gets submerged during high tide. Not far from Mararison Island is Batbatan islet with its equally inviting coral reefs.

Culasi, particularly, Lipata point is historically significant, for having been made as a temporary port for the submarines of the Allied Forces during the WWII.

Practically, the whole length of the province’s coast from Anini-y to Libertad is dotted with beaches and historical landmarks, such as the watch towers at Bugasong and Libertad, and beaches, foremost of which are those of Taguimtim, Cadiao, Hatay-Hatay, Manglamon, and Barbaza, Piῆa.

The sturdy churches built by the Spanish friars in major towns of the province have survived years of natural calamities and still are the center of the people’s activities. Virtually, every major town has one.

Other inland attractions are the Pula waterfalls and Lake Danao of San Remigio which is already known for its Bato Cueva; Macalbag waterfalls of Barbaza; Bugang River of Pandan; Tiguis cave of Tibiao which also boasts of a swift river ideal for kayaking; Sebaste’s waterfalls; and, guano-filled Maanghit Cave of Libertad. A less explored group of islands are those that compose the municipality of Caluya, which aside from the island town, are Bogtongan and Semirara, known for their white beaches, and with the latter enjoying a protection as bird sanctuary.

Near the Aklan boundary in the north is Pandan, a town famous for its Malumpati Beach and Hot Springs. It is much nearer Kalibo, though, as the travel time on a pumpboat is a little more than an hour. The late governor Evelio Javier brought me to this place for a pumpboat ride to Boracay when this internationally-renowned island was just in its virginal state. He guided me around the famous island, whose powdery white beaches at the time were just dotted with quaint fishermen’s lean-to cottages. During his lifetime, the brisk development of the island was perhaps far from his mind, because of its almost inaccessibility. He was an advocate of ecology and what I will never forget while we were tracing our steps back to the waiting pumpboat, was when he told me, “I hope this island will not be damaged by the tourism industry…” He was proud of Boracay, as though, it was within the scope of Antique, for geographically and politically, the island is part of the neighboring Aklan province. By God’s design, perhaps, he did not live long to be saddened at how Boracay looks like now. He was mercilessly assassinated on February 11, 1986. To commemorate his staunch leadership as a young governor of the province, the EBJ Freedom Park was built in his name.

While in Antique, one can always find something to do, as it is replete with varying natural endowments – from nature tripping to culture research, and religious exploration. It is this variation that made its youthful governor, the late, Evelio B. Javier advocate ecology-based tourism so that both the man-made and natural legacies can be preserved and shared by the Antiqueῆos with the world – in their unspoiled state. He must have felt the fear for the onslaught of the uncontrolled tourism industry to happen years beyond his lifetime, hence, his heartfelt advocacy. Unfortunately, his fear has become a reality….

Today, every time Antique is mentioned, what comes to my mind is the face of the late “manong Belio”, as how I called him then. He was the first governor I met who did not have any single bodyguard when moving around. He always had time to be with his people, even driving to as far as Valderrama, an inland town, to play basketball with the young farmers. Most especially, he was proud of his culture, and his Karay-a dialect that he uses without qualm, every time he had an opportunity. I just hope that his spirit will guide the Antiqueῆos so that his advocacy will live on.

A Friend, a gem…

A Friend, a gem…

(For Rex Velez)

 

By Apolinario B. Villalobos

 

 

Friends are earned

Not just by a simple acquaintance

Made in a  day, a week, a month

It’s more than having lunch together

Or enjoying toasts in a drinking spree

But years of being together

Sharing heartaches, and laughter.

 

And having a friend like Rex

Is like having found a gem

In a pile of unwanted stones

That for long, scorched by sun

Coated with layers of dust

Washed with torrential rains

Till exposed by time and sparkled.

 

Emotionally strong

He never buckled under a heavy load

Instead, smiled his way

Through the onslaught of storms

Showing the rest how to enjoy life

This he did with uttered inspirations

And resolved persevering actions.

 

Ripples in the Stream

Ripples in the Stream

By Apolinario B Villalobos

I have always been fascinated

by the stream –

mesmerized by the murmur

that the flowing water makes

as a pebble is thrown into it,

and as the current hits a rock,

as if protesting the presence

that hinders

its smooth journey

along the crevice of the earth.

The gentle touch of a dragonfly,

the sudden appearance of a fish’s snout,

the splash of swimming children,

the soft touch of a falling leaf,

the sudden gust of wind,

the trickles of incessant rain –

cause the ripples that rupture

the earth’s gently flowing stream.

Now that I am old,

I realized

that God has reasons

for  everything,

so He gave us intelligence

to understand them all

without any misgiving.

Indeed, just like a stream

that gets dented with ripples,

challenges and trials

make us cry in anguish;

and like a stream

that just keeps on flowing

there is nothing we can do

but go on living…

If the stream can keep on flowing,

so should we  –

let our lives flow

along the crevice of destiny.

Pride and Mistakes

Pride and Mistakes

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

Nobody is free from the guilt of committing mistakes, be they petty or enormous.

Nobody shall ever learn unless he or she has committed mistakes, hence, the adage “learn from mistakes”.

 

While some are humble enough to learn from mistakes…the rest are overwhelmed by their pride… they refuse to admit their mistakes. The refusal is like a chain that holds them back from moving on.

 

The mistakes we made are steps we took towards our destiny. Refusing then, in admitting our mistakes shall imply that we did not move on, since we did not make any step at all!

The arrogant cannot accept the fact that man is not perfect…or that man is bound to commit mistakes in life.

 

Pride feeds on adoration of accumulated wealth, dizzying success, or plain appalling  attitude. The arrogant filthy rich thinks, his money can buy anything, including power to hide mistakes. The success-intoxicated man thinks that he can do just anything better than anybody else, otherwise he can’t be successful. And, there’s the simply conceited man who sees himself as the only rightfully thinking creation of God, with the rest, wallowing in mistakes.

 

I think, the best thing to do, is evaluate what we have done and said at the end of the day. It is important to know if we have done anything that could have displeased others, hence, displease Him. That is the reason, perhaps, why He gave us brains. Let us put to proper use that one attribute which makes us superior to the rest of His creations.

 

The Journey of Man

The Journey of Man…

And the Mother’s Extended Hand

 

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

Since birth man is destined to undertake a journey…

 

As a helpless infant, he is helped in his journey by his mother. As a toddler when he has learned to crawl, his curiosity brings him to all directions of his playpen, living room of the house, bedroom, anywhere that he is allowed to explore.

 

When he learns to take a few steps, he goes further where accidents that he encounter give him lessons to be learned as regards things that should be touched or play with.

 

When he enters a prep school, his physical journey is coupled with mental explorations through the pages of coloring  and big-lettered illustrated books.

 

When he joins his peers in elementary he steps up the ladder of knowledge that he continues to do as he enters high school and college. Along the way, he meets friends.

 

Everybody’s been through all these…

 

The journey is not without difficulties. And, to help us through them, there’s always our mother who would extend a hand every time we stumble. Through thick and thin, she is always around giving us assurance, always ready to help.

 

I cannot  just imagine life without a mother!

 

Patience is one virtue that mothers are born with. Our mother overflows with it.

 

In our journey, we always see her hand giving us directions. Sometimes we feel it, as she pushes us on if we are at the verge of quitting. Sometimes her hand would give us a slight pat if we make mistakes.

 

As for me, I have done my best to follow the right direction in my effort to reach my destination. This I did as I tread on long roads that sometimes wind through rock-strewn hills, as they poetically say of challenges.

 

Yes, the road of life is not that smooth. But thanks to the extended hand of my mother.  At last, I am where I should be…        

Jaime Mayor…honest kutsero of Luneta By Apolinario B Villalobos At

Jaime Mayor

…honest kutsero of Luneta

 

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

 

At dawn, from his humble home in Caloocan

He diligently pedals his way to Luneta

The same he does when he goes home at night

But all these he does with unpretentious delight.

 

In Luneta, for years, he worked as kutsero

Guiding his tame horse, he fondly calls Rapido

Both of them braving the rain and searing sun

Even  pangs of hunger as best as they can.

 

A typical Filipino, this guy – Jaime Mayor

For earning honestly, he could not ask for more

With perpetual smile on his sun-burned face

He and Rapido, in Luneta, strollers can’t miss.

 

One day, his honesty was put to a test

When a purse was left behind by a tourist

Whom he pursued just before she was gone

And who was amazed by such an honest man.

 

Tightly he was hugged and praised to heavens

In a language that sounded strange to him

But just the same, these he took in stride

Though, his appreciation, he could not hide.

 

He said, he is proud to be a Filipino

And proud that he lives in a beautiful country

His modest knowledge of English, then…

Is always ended with –

“It’s more fun to be in the Philippines”!

 

 

(Jaime Mayor is a driver (kutsero) of a horse-driven rig (kalesa) in Luneta (Rizal Park) of Manila. His average daily earning is Php200.00. This is carefully budgeted to suffice for the needs of his wife and four children. One day he drove around the park four French ladies, one of whom left her purse in the back seat of the rig. After noticing it, he practically ran after the group. The ladies were amazed. The owner of the purse gave him a tight hug. On September 13, 2012, the Rizal Park administration gave him a plaque of appreciation.)

Failures Can Push You

Failures Can Push You

 

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

Yes, it’s true…

Failures can push you

Even further if you bear in mind

Your aspirations in life;

All you need is check

What mistakes were made;

Do not blame others, too

For it’s only you

And you alone

Who directs your life

Though others could inspire you

In some ways they can help

But just the same

Always think that success

Can be attained

If only you will do your part

The best you can, and

Think positive –

For it can be done!

Ruby(Young Hooker of Manila) By Apolinario B Villalobos A star

Ruby

(Young Hooker of Manila)

 

By Apolinario B Villalobos

 

A star sapphire glitters in the dark

just when your first cry tore the silence apart

and two faces smile with no word said

but a heartfelt thanks to the God above.

 

Into this world comes forth

another flower for their eyes and bundle of joy

who there lies for every body to behold

and now your story’s being told.

 

You’ve trodden enough

roads of stones and thorns so rough

for a woman but you are strong in heart

and full of hope that even the searing sun

could not wilt your will

melt your strength as you go on still

just like the fire

I find in your name.

Who Lives Longer?…man or woman

Who Lives Longer?…man or woman

By:  Apolinario B. Villalobos

While the question on strength and intelligence has oftentimes been raisedbetween the two genders, the issue on longevity is almost always not given so much attention.  And, this despite the fact that the matter has its effect on our social structure in general. Say, who would take care of the one who would outlive the other? What if the wife outlives the husband or the other way around happens? – are just two of the questions with regard to this issue.

Scientific findings supported by statistics show that women, indeed, outlive men.  And, in this fact is where the difference matters.  As a tradition, the man who is expected to be stronger than the woman is expected to take care of the latter as they grow old, and because of this expectation, the wife is plunged into various depressions brought about by loneliness when she survives her husband.

Tradition dictates that on the issue of partnership, man must be older than the woman, as the former is expected to set out house rules, hence, the authority.  Lately, however, some researchers aver that the reason for the age factor is due to the fact that the woman show external manifestation of aging faster than man.  So that between a twenty-year-old woman who marries a twenty-five-year old man, the former already has an advantage of five years, hence, the concept of her outliving the latter.

Research findings have helped a lot in the understanding of the biologic factors that influence the life expectancy of both the man and the woman.  However, other key factors involve choices of lifestyles that can lead to a full and active, hence, longer life. Playing important roles in determining the life expectancy of both sexes are the hereditary factors in which some hormones are seen to have a very significant part. Our glands produce these chemicals that affect the organs in which they are produced oraffect other organs by travelling through the bloodstream.

 Each gender may be made unique by some hormones.  For one, estrogen appear to protect women from coronary atherosclerosis, making them at risk with this disease only between the age of 65 to 74, compared to the men’s risk upon reaching the age of 55 until 64. Modern science has afforded the financially capable women to undergo some kind of estrogen replacement when they reach the menopausal age during which estrogenproduction of their glands diminishes rapidly.  This therapy also helps prevent osteoporosis.

 On the other hand, vanity that is more attached to feminity has given the woman an excuse for external physical retouches – facials, bustlifts, regular skin smoothening that include chemicals that eradicate wrinkles, liposuctions, and the like. The trend has radically changed the marketing strategies and diversified the products of laboratory firms that made the forty-up age bracket of women as a veritable and a gold slice of the market for their products that flood outlets – from body lotion, make-up accessories, shampoo, and injectibles.  Ads clearly specify the intended target of the products even coming up with photos of mothers and daughter for customers “to see the difference and judge for themselves.”

How about the men?  Well, the macho gender has a way of proving his virility despite the ascending number that comes with years of his life.  It is a fact that man can still be fertile even at age seventy or even past that age.  This is how beerhouses and nightclubs and some discreet videoke bars have flourished.  Man does not need make-up and smooth skin to prove his virility.  A pocket bulging with cash will do.

 We now find that the effort of both sexes are expensive, seen from any angle or even how much justifications are rattled.  Unfortunately, these efforts have their consequences – the course of modern living.  Casual sex on the part of the men to prove that they can still do it, although most of the time done with other parts could result to hideous STDs (sexually transmitted diseases).  As for the women, overdose of those beauty products could result to blotchy skin due to indiscriminate use of skin bleach, cancerous breast due to improper implants, loss of facial expression due to overdose of injectible wrinkle “erasers”, and even damage internal organs due to overdose of synthetic hormones.

The question now that we should seriously ponder is not who gets or looks older earlier or faster, the man or woman, but who had been and will be more productive and useful.  For the woman, remember what you always assert – equality of genders.  And for the man, do not forget chivalry that is eternally marked in manhood.