Two Untitled Haikus

Two Untitled Haikus

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

1..

A thank uttered by trembling lips

moved by sincerity from the heart

has more weight than tons of gold

given without even a taint of gratitude.

 

2.

A single grain counts a lot in a pile –

each is a fragment that adds to height

when a child gathers them as he plays

a delight he may not forget for days.

The Extra Mile

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

 

The Extra Mile

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

The extra mile I am referring to is about the effort that we exert to help other people without expecting any return. While some companies make such effort an integral part of their service to gain promo mileage, there are people who just do the act as if it is a part of their system. And, it is nice to know that despite the prevailing modernity in our environment today, this kindly act is still very much noticeable.

 

Volunteerism is a simpler word that can easily define the effort. For those who are fond of browsing the electronic web to while their time away, a prominent group of volunteers composed of medical practioners, can easily catch the attention, and whose advocacy is to serve the persons with disability (PWD’s). It is the group of Dr. Josephine Bundoc of UERMMMCI and UP-PGH which has been instrumental in providing artificial limbs to PWD’s  who live in as far as the southern island of Mindanao.

 

Unsung heroes of calamities deserve profound appreciation for joining the throng of volunteers from all walks of life who show up at relief operation centers to repack donated goods or find their place in a line of donation handlers at evacuation sites. They are one in saying that they have no money to spare but they have the hands to serve.

 

These “angels” just pop up at a moment and just anywhere when help is much needed. One Wednesday morning, while waiting for a ride to Cavite, I saw a woman who panicked when a bulging plastic bag that she was carrying just gave up and let go of her groceries.  As I doubled my steps toward her, a boy in a tattered shirt appeared from nowhere and helped her gather the groceries. When I finally reached her, the boy told us to wait while he would get another bag for the groceries. In a few minutes he was back with a bag as promised and after all the groceries found their way into the bag, the boy bid us goodbye, leaving the woman and I unprepared for we were not given the chance to say thanks or hand him a few coins for his snacks as an expression of gratitude.

 

The country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines had the so-called Total Passenger Care Program during the ‘80s that further illuminated its image. Practically, all employees were encouraged  to make an extra step for the comfort of customers, from mere inquiry by phone or at any office to their arrival at destination. Answering the phone the proper way and speaking in unhurried manner is already an extra mile to make callers comfortable and at ease, thereby, encouraging them to ask more questions. A sincere smile of the counter personnel attending to the needs of customers at the ticketing office, makes the latter happy to be served by the company.

 

In Davao airport, I had the chance to witness how all staff of Philippine Airlines, manning the check- in counter and the load control office where the supervisor was also based, managed to handle a critical situation due to unexpected overflow of passengers. The situation was made worse by those who came all the way from General Santos airport where they got bumped off. All personnel act in synch with each other without even a faint trace of snootiness despite the pressure. Instead, every now and then, they would apologize for the inconvenience, although, their best effort to accommodate everybody was evident. The supervisor himself, Archie Batu showed coolness that the rest of the staff emulated until the last flight was dispatched. Although, about three or four were forced to wait for the next day’s flight for accommodation, no grumbling from them was heard, because they saw how miles and miles of extra effort were exerted but to no avail. The following day, the rest of overflow was accommodated. I was among them.

 

The extra mile can go a long way in developing satisfaction among customers. It also gives hope to those who consider themselves unwanted by society because of their deficiencies. If the extra mile that a person takes can be connected with the rest of extra miles of the millions of people on earth, it can go around the globe. And, that is the idea…extra miles of kindness that can unite humanity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loyalty and Gratitude

Loyalty and Gratitude

By Apolinario Villalobos

 

Loyalty is about faithfulness and devotion when it comes to our relationship with God or love ones. It is about allegiance and trustworthiness when it comes to our relationship with our country. It is about reliability and dependability when it comes to our job. It is about steadfastness when it comes to our principle. But for a deeper and emotional connotation, it is about love.

 

Loyalty is grounded on gratitude. When one is born into this world, gratitude to his parents is already ingrained in his consciousness. As he grows, he becomes grateful to his elder siblings for providing him company at home as playmates and the same  feeling is developed towards his friends outside their home –  solace given during that critical development stage of his life as a child . Then, he becomes loyal to his teachers for giving him guidance in learning his ABC’s until he is able to finish a course. On finding a job, he becomes loyal to his employer. Much later, he becomes loyal to his spouse because of the gratitude for being a partner in building a home for the family that they start to raise.

 

It is a cycle.  But, there is one segment of the cycle that most people fail to give extra attention – the one about the stage where one finds a particular job that he considers “it”, a job that will prop him up financially until he retires. That particular segment of the cycle is supposed to be the start of his life as head of family under the roof of his own home.  For people who had richer lessons in life, finding a job and sticking to it is a serious matter. By richer lessons, I mean, lessons learned from insufficiencies while growing up, because they make one learn how to respect hard-earned money, respect time which when wasted cannot be recovered, and make use to the fullest every opportunity found along the way.

 

The people referred above, cannot help but consider the job that they find best for them as their “life”. By simple reckoning, we may say that we spent at least twenty years with our parents in a stage that included our mental development by going to school and finally finishing a course. But after being weaned from their care, that is, after finding a job and having a family of our own, we practically spend the precious time between our own home and our job.

 

Our job gives us the needed assurance that we will be able to raise our family, although, nowadays, some jobs are not gratifying enough as regards take home pay. At this point, loyalty is not well developed towards the job, and employees referred here even bad mouth their employer, which is not the proper thing to do. The best decision is for those not satisfied to resign and look for another job.

 

Some people, albeit not satisfied with their job, hold on to it, for fear that if they resign they might not be able to find a better one. Unconsciously, they harbor ill feeling toward their employer until retirement. The hate surfaces when these retirees find it difficult to even whisper a single thank to their former employer. And to think, that they are supposed to have built their career in the turf of such employer…that without the employer that they hate, they may not have been able to buy a home, although, on long installment….that without the employer, they may not have been able to send their children to school…that without the employer, they may not have been able to go through a much needed operation, etc.

 

One comment of an officemate who retired way ahead of me is about forgetting the company after giving the office one last look and taking hurried steps away from it.  I told her that I cannot do that because without the job that I learned to love, I would not have discovered my skills developed in seminars which the company made me attend… I would not have met people whose names I only read in dailies and magazines…. I would not have gone to places, pictures of which I saw only in magazines as a student. And, most importantly, how can I forget the company that gave me a salary that I wisely spent to be able to survive comfortably?

 

On a more serious tone, if we have the gull to refuse in looking back to where we came from due to ungratefulness and hate, how much more in supposedly looking up to the One with heartfelt gratitude for His unconditional act of love for us, even to the extent of offering His life for our salvation?